Posts in Category: Australiana

everything of relevance to or pertaining to Australiana, often referred to by me as Oz.

Pronunciation of Australian English 4

 Sounds of Consonants Part 2

Generally these consonant sounds are more difficult for non-native English speakers and so they need a lot more practice.

Pronunciation of Australian English 3

Sounds of Consonants Part 1

Consonants are the third basic types of sounds in English. When consonant sounds are made, air coming from your mouth is partly or fully restricted (blocked).

Pronunciation of Australian English 1

Sounds of Vowels

In English speaking, a vowel is a speech sound made with your mouth open and your tongue in the middle of your mouth not touching your teeth, lips or other inside parts.

Pronunciation of Australian English 2

Sounds of  Diphthongs

Diphthong       sounds are made by combining one vowel with another.

Some Features of Australian Society

Introduction
As with language, society is constantly changing. Also, it goes without saying, no country’s people are all identical in personality and behaviour. So, please note, the outline here is just a brief snapshot of Australian society.
Australian society used to be much more egalitarian, easy-going and casual. Traditionally, Australian society had probably 60% of people in the same class (working/ middle class). Increasing economic inequality over the past 50 years has shown itself by people more concerned about such things as high-earning occupations; large houses; fashionable clothes and fancy cars. However, most Australians still cling to “the idea” that we are all equal.

Business clothes (dress)
in general, although some people wear suits, many Australian people dress more casually for work than Japanese. Denim jeans is not so common, but other casual (but neat) pants and shirt (or skirt and blouse for women) is OK. At interviews, suits are most common.

Business meetings (visits)
We don`t have quite as many meetings and out of work dinners and parties as Japan. At a business lunch or dinner, business comes before the meal or drinking and socialising. Business cards are not normally exchanged upon first meeting. If you need a colleague’s contact information, it is ok to ask them for their card. It is also ok to offer someone your card. But there is not an elaborate ritual of exchanging cards

Demeanour
Australians (in general) are more assertive than English people and less assertive than Americans. Australians are certainly a bit more assertive and quicker to speak their opinions and disagree than Japanese. We also touch much more than Japanese and make eye contact more.

Dining (eating)
BYO  (bring your own) alcohol and often food is still fairly common. At restaurants bill splitting (friends, couples, bigger groups)is also common.

Forms of Address
We don´t often call people Mr Smith, but rather Robert. We almost never call another adult “Sir” except in business letters. Some service people may address customers as “Sir or Madam”.

Gestures and body language
Australians use typical Western gestures for things such as “Come here, go away, stop, pointing, shaking hands”. Many of these are quite different to Japanese versions.

Giving Gifts
We only usually give presents on Xmas, weddings and birthdays. Most people try to give fairly modest, inexpensive gifts. We seldom give gifts to people we have just met.

Holidays
Most workers get 4 weeks paid holiday. There is also a few days leave for sickness or special events. School teachers get 8 weeks holiday. (but they deserve it!)

Noises
Australians will accept much more noise from neighbours than do Japanese.

Personal Space See Demeanour

Religion
In the past, Australian society has been very secular (like Japan) and certainly not as fundamental as many American religious people. For example, although most Australians say they are Christians, not so many go to church regularly. Recent conservative Australian governments show more leanings towards religious fundamentalism. For example, although the majority of Australian people are tolerant towards gay persons, the government refuses to consider legalizing same-sex marriages.

Smoking
This has become very socially unacceptable in the past 10 years. There are very few public places where you can smoke now.

Social visits
Much more than Japanese, we meet our friends at each others houses. In Japan, I got very few invitations to visit Japanese people at their home. Japanese seem to meet more at restaurants and Izakaya.

Stereotypes
Australians are friendly, easy going and not very formal. We regard workers as equal in status to bosses and address them equally.

Telephone Etiquette
similar to Japan I think.

Tipping
It´s not common practice to tip (taxis, waiters, etc.) in Australia.

Toilets
We say toilets, rather than bathrooms or rest-rooms.
We “have” a shower (or bath), we don`t “take” a shower. (unlike Americans)

Australian English

Australian English  (a short introduction)

Some explanation of Australian English

Please keep in your mind that Australian language is changing (as language does in other countries). This is a result of great changes in society. As the society changes, so does the language. So, older Australian idioms and slang are not used so much by all Australians anymore. Also American slang such as “dude”, “cool”, “chill out” and “bling”  have become common.  

  1. Common old Australian slang words  

mate                            friend

ta                                 thank you

ta-ta                            bye bye, or see you

sanger                         a sandwich

banger                        a sausage

barbie                         barbecue

bewdy!                        great!   [beauty]

footy                          Australian football

 

  1. A few common Australian words and phrases  

The big smoke –  This is what country people call the big cities.

The sticks – This is what city people call places in the country. (it means far away from the convenience of the city).

Don’t worry about it   – it’s ok OR don’t take too much trouble.

Good on you               – I like what you said or did.

Hang on                      – wait a minute.

 

BELOW ARE MORE EXAMPLES

A. Did you bring an umbrella?

B. No, I forgot.

A. Don`t worry about it, I have 2 umbrellas.

B. Good on you.

A.Can you help me?

B. Hang on, I`ll just answer my phone first.

A. Ok, I`ll wait.

“Don´t worry about it” (This is casual speech)

You say it if somebody apologises about something, e.g.
A. I´m sorry I´m late
B. Don´t worry about it.

If somebody thanks you e.g.
A. Thank´s for the lift.
B. Don´t worry about it.

(if you spill a drink, or bump into somebody)

“a lift” – a ride in somebody else´s car.

“do you mind?” e.g.
A. Do you mind giving me a lift into the city?
B. Sure, no worries.

(not a problem)

“Good on you” –

This is a sign of good feelings toward you.

Somebody may say this if you help them carry shopping groceries,

or if you open the door for them

or if you have been doing something good like hard study, or you have finished writing an essay.

 

  1. Common greetings 

A bit formal –
A.Good morning/afternoon
B. Good morning/afternoon

A.How are you?
B. Fine thank you, and yourself?
A I`m well, thank you

A bit  casual –
A.Good day, mate                      B. Good day.
A .How you going?                     B. Pretty good, and you?
A. I`m good.

Very casual –
A.Hi                                                    B. Hi
A. How are you?                                  B. Not bad
A. What`s new?                                   B. Nothing much.
A. Did you have a good weekend?         B. Pretty good.

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the Beach

it’s well known that Aussies love the beach.
However, it’s probably true to say that we take our beaches for granted.
Most overseas visitors are boggle-eyed at seeing so many beautiful beaches.
Anyway, we took a casual drive to the ocean this morning.( New Year’s Eve 2013)
It was actually cloudy and a lot cooler than yesterday.